Wheel Alignment Austin, TX

Wheel Alignment is done at the time brand-new tires are set up, and can easily be checked with your regular tire rotation. Lamb’s Tire & Automotive offers quality affordable Austin, TX auto repair services.

What it does: Wheels must be lined up correctly to keep suitable control of your car. Wheels that are out of position could cause driving to become difficult in addition to cause uneven ware on the tires. When your wheels are properly lined up, your car will offer a smoother ride.

Why service is essential: Wheel Alignment as well as tire balancing and rotation could expand the life of your tires, and boost the total safety of your vehicle. An effectively aligned automobile may enhance performance as well as increase fuel economy.

Wheel Alignments  in Austin, TX Protect the Life of Your Tires

Your wheels may have to be lined up if:

  •  You experience vibration when turning
  •  The steering wheel pulls to the left or right
  •  The steering wheel is not straight when driving on a straight roadway
  •  Your tire tread is wearing unevenly

An alignment check features:

  •  Assessment of the steering and suspension components
  •  Examination of the tires for size, inflation and wear
  •  Comparison of your tire alignment to automobile manufacturer guidelines

Lamb’s Tire & Automotive offers quality Wheel Alignment in Austin, TX

Our auto repair mechanics can also inspect for steering and suspension concerns, as well as drive-line complications. Visit us to have our certified technicians provide you with a dependable wheel alignment. Call us soon to arrange your next Wheel Alignment in conjunction with your other Austin, TX auto repair services. Lamb’s Tire & Automotive is thrilled to be your local auto repair center and provider of tires in Austin, TX.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Have your Wheel Alignment checked every other tire rotation and always when installing new tires. Wheel alignment sometimes referred to as tracking, is part of standard automobile maintenance that consists of adjusting the angles of the wheels so that they are set to the car maker’s specification. The purpose of these adjustments is to reduce tire wear, and to ensure that vehicle travel, is straight and true (without “pulling” to one side). Alignment angles can also be altered beyond the maker’s specifications to obtain a specific handling characteristic. Motorsport and off-road applications may call for angles to be adjusted well beyond “normal” for a variety of reasons.

A camera unit (sometimes called a “head”) is attached to a specially designed clamp which holds on to a wheel. There are usually four camera units in a wheel alignment system (a camera unit for each wheel). The camera units communicate their physical positioning with respect to other camera units to a central computer which calculates and displays how much the camber, toe and caster are misaligned.

Often with alignment equipment, these “heads” can be a large precision reflector. In this case, the alignment “tower” contains the cameras as well as arrays of LEDs. This system flashes one array of LEDs for each reflector whilst a camera centrally located in the LED array “looks for” an image of the reflectors patterned face. These cameras perform the same function as the other style of alignment equipment, yet alleviate numerous issues prone to relocating a heavy precision camera assembly on each vehicle serviced.

Primary Angles

The primary angles are the basic angle alignment of the wheels relative to each other and to the car body. These adjustments are the camber, caster and toe. On some cars, not all of these can be adjusted on every wheel.

These three parameters can be further categorized into front and rear, so summarily the parameters are:

Front: Caster (right& left)

  • Front: Camber (right & left)
  • Front: Toe (left, right & total)
  • Rear: Camber (left & right)
  • Rear: Toe (left, right & total)
  • Rear: Thrust angle

Secondary Angles

The secondary angles include numerous other adjustments, such as:

    SAI (left & right)

  • Included angle (left & right)
  • Toe out on turns (left & right)
  • Maximum Turns (left & right)
  • Toe curve change (left & right)
  • Track width difference
  • Wheelbase difference
  • Front ride height (left & right)
  • Rear ride height (left & right)
  • Frame angle

Setback (front & rear) is often referred as a wheel alignment angle. However setback simply exists because of the measuring system and does not have any specification from car manufacturers.

Wheel Alignment Tip
Have your Wheel Alignment checked every other tire rotation and always when installing new tires. Wheel alignment sometimes referred to as tracking, is part of standard automobile maintenance.
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